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Case Series
7 (
1
); 60-69
doi:
10.25259/JISH_30_2023

Exploring the types of interpersonal conflicts using NRI-RQV and the emerging homoeopathic remedies: A case series

Department of Psychiatry, Dr. M. L. Dhawale Memorial Homoeopathic Institute Palghar, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Corresponding author: Dr. Priyanka V. Kewalramani, Department of Psychiatry, Dr. M. L. Dhawale Memorial Homoeopathic Institute Palghar, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. priyuk5509@gmail.com
Licence
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Kewalramani PV, Yadav RR. Exploring the types of interpersonal conflicts using NRI-RQV and the emerging homoeopathic remedies: A case series. J Intgr Stand Homoeopathy. 2024;7:60-9. doi: 10.25259/JISH_30_2023

Abstract

Interpersonal relationships (IPRs) have been the core of our social system since the dawn of civilisation. Stable and healthy IPR bring joy and satisfaction in life, while unsteady IPR develops conflictive emotions. These, in the longer run, can cause psychological disturbances that are evident easily by a peculiar mental state, that is, a combination of different categories of mental symptoms, namely symptoms of intellect, emotion and behaviour or can also reflect on the body as somatic symptoms. Literature of Homoeopathic Materia Medica describes mental symptoms from strained IPRs but does not explain the type of conflict/s which results in particular mental states of corresponding homoeopathic remedies. The objective of this study was to study the influence of different types of interpersonal conflicts on the choice of homoeopathic similimum. Four cases were selected using a network of relationship inventory-relationship quality version scale, and their IPR conflicts were studied. Conflicts were classified, emerging mental states from conflicts and their expression both physically and mentally were studied and remedies prescribed based on homoeopathic totality. Three prominent types of conflicts identified after studying all the cases were as follows: Ego conflicts, Value conflicts and Pseudo conflicts. The prominent mental states resulting from these conflicts were dissatisfaction, indifference, forsakenness and depressed state. Mineral kingdom remedies specially showed value conflicts, Plant kingdom mainly showed Pseudo conflicts and Ego conflicts were seen mainly in Animal kingdom remedies. Almost all cases showed good improvement in overcoming interpersonal conflicts in the follow-ups. The choice of homoeopathic similimum is influenced by different types of IPR conflicts, and remedies could be prescribed corresponding to them with satisfactory results.

Keywords

Interpersonal relationship
Network of relationship inventory-relationship quality version
Homoeopathic similimum

INTRODUCTION

Interpersonal relationships (IPRs) are built around us in family, friends and communities, and at the workplace. However, one may not agree with others all the time, which results in interpersonal conflicts. These conflicts, when not identified, communicated or left unresolved, produce negative emotions such as anger, frustration, and jealousy and foster unhealthy relationships. Studies on IPRs prove that such disrupted and distressed IPRs may occasionally become serious stressors; these conflicts may cause many mental health-related problems, such as anxiety or depression.[1] The Homoeopathic Materia Medica describes mental symptoms from strained IPRs; for example, the Calcarea carb lady is highly emotional and reacts irrationally when she is upset at her husband hurting her and in anger, she may leave her house without a note.[2] However, the literature on which type of conflict results in what state and the corresponding homoeopathic medicines is inadequate. Hence, this study aimed to explore the types of interpersonal conflicts and their influence on individuals and the selection of homoeopathic similimum.

TYPES OF INTERPERSONAL CONFLICT AND ITS EXPRESSIONS

Interpersonal conflict is a dynamic process that occurs between interdependent parties as they experience negative emotional reactions to perceived disagreements and interference with the attainment of their goals.[3] In our everyday lives, we usually encounter four types of conflicts:[4]

  1. Value conflicts: Conflicts due to disagreements about deep-seated moral beliefs. Values are beliefs that people use to give meaning to their lives. Values explain what is ‘good’ or’ bad, ‘right’ or ‘wrong’, ‘just’ or ‘unjust. Value disputes arise only when people attempt to force one set of values on others or lay claim to exclusive value systems that do not allow for divergent beliefs.

  2. Ego conflicts: This type of conflict occurs as a result of personality differences between two people. Losing an argument would damage the person’s self-esteem. It develops when both parties in disagreement insist on being the ‘winner’ of the argument.

  3. Policy conflicts: It is due to a disagreement over a plan or course of action. Policy conflicts are about how to deal with a situation, and here, people cannot agree on a problem-solving strategy or action plan in a given situation.

  4. Pseudo-conflicts: When misunderstandings or perceptual differences lead to differences in opinions, they are termed pseudo-conflicts. Trivial issues are pseudo-conflicts, minor disagreements that mask deeper intrapersonal conflicts in relationships, mocking and teasing; taunting can result in pseudo-conflicts and may lead to communication breakdown.

EXPRESSIONS OF CONFLICTS

  1. At the physical level: Increased fatigue, poor sleep quality and depressive symptoms. Conditions such as migraine, duodenal ulcer, ulcerative colitis, asthma, neurodermatitis and essential hypertension are known to be caused by disturbed IPR.[5]

  2. At the emotional level, depression and anxiety caused by impaired IPRs may lead to suicidal attempts.[6]

  3. At the intellectual level: Emotional stress due to strained IPR is clinically evident in the drop in performance and efficiency in work as well as clouding of perception in the form of poor judgment, confusion and indecisiveness.[6]

IPR CONFLICT IN HOMOEOPATHY

Dr. Hahnemann demanded an understanding of the individual, the total human being. This is required to treat the patient as a whole and not merely a disease. The physician needs to examine the patient’s evolving IPRs from childhood onward regarding wishes, ambitions and vocations, which can help them know the patient’s affections, hatred, resentment, vexations, fears and guilt feelings [Figure 1].[7]

A schematic representation of an individual’s interpersonal relationships in different life areas. F: Father, M: Mother, B: Brother, S: Sister, PGP: Paternal grand parents, MGP: Maternal grand parents, SO: Son, D: Daughter, H: Husband, FIL: Father in law, MIL: Mother in law, SIL: Sister in law, BIL: Brother in law
Figure 1:
A schematic representation of an individual’s interpersonal relationships in different life areas. F: Father, M: Mother, B: Brother, S: Sister, PGP: Paternal grand parents, MGP: Maternal grand parents, SO: Son, D: Daughter, H: Husband, FIL: Father in law, MIL: Mother in law, SIL: Sister in law, BIL: Brother in law

Clinical experience shows that most problems of the mind emanate from disturbed relationships in the family and then extend to progressively engulf other fields of an individual’s working or social life. Disturbances, here, can serve as precipitants or powerful maintaining factors of illnesses and hence need to be noted and dealt with.[8]

NETWORK OF RELATIONSHIP INVENTORY-RELATIONSHIP QUALITY VERSION (NRI-RQV)

As conflict is inevitable and can be attributed to a range of circumstances, from minor disagreement to deeper or violent conflict, it is necessary to have some tool which helps to eliminate subjective bias and can help assess interpersonal conflicts.

The third version of NRI – referred to as the NRI-RQV [Annexure 1] – employs an eclectic set of relationship qualities to assess five negative relationship features such as criticism, dominance, exclusion, pressure and conflict, and five positive relationship features such as companionship, disclosure, emotional support, approval and satisfaction among adolescents, and adults.

Here, the same set of items is used to describe their relationship with each of several members of their social network (e.g. mother, father, sibling, friend, romantic partner and teacher). It has an option in each version for an extra person.[9]

Kenny et al. conducted a study on IPRs and emotional distress in adolescents using NRI-RQV, which revealed that high levels of satisfaction in IPRs were predictive of a low level of emotional distress, whereas a high level of criticism and exclusion was associated with a high level of emotional distress.[10]

IPR CONFLICTS IN HOMOEOPATHIC MATERIA MEDICA

  • Mineral kingdom: The mineral group of remedies shows high values for identity, responsibility, performance, security, positions and relationships. The themes of ‘structure’ and ‘organisation’ run through this group, with conflicts arising while maintaining the same.[11]

  • Plant Kingdom: This group of remedies is sensitive but vulnerable. Plants’ survival depends on their reaction to the environment. They tend to react and respond to every stimulus, such as weather, temperature, grief, criticism and disappointments.[11]

  • Animal Kingdom: The main theme of animal remedies is the issue of survival. Regarding survival, we see the following themes: competition, high and low, aggressor and victim, strong and weak. The split exists within the self also. I hate myself, I versus myself. I am disgusted with myself. Attraction and sexuality are very important for the propagation of the species.[11]

Objectives of the study

  1. Objective: The objective of this study was to study the influence of different types of interpersonal conflicts on the choice of the homoeopathic similimum.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Informed consent in the respective language (Hindi/Marathi) was taken from all those involved. A detailed case history of the patient was taken to identify any IPR conflicts at the family, workplace and social levels. The NRI-RQV was used to assess and validate the presence of interpersonal conflicts. Expressions of conflicts and mental states that emerged were studied. Medicines based on totality and emerging remedies were prescribed and analysed based on types of interpersonal conflict.

CASE SERIES

Case 1

A 30-year-old man reported severe pain in swollen varicosities of veins of both legs for 4–5 years with mild itching. Worse on walking+2 and night+2 and better after rest+3.

Life history

The patient narrates about strained IPR with his parents since childhood; he felt his parents treated him differently and gave more attention to his brother. The patient never shared his emotions of feeling neglected with anyone in the family.

In college, he pursued arts due to his father’s insistence due to financial problems and blamed him but never expressed his feelings. While searching for job opportunities, he started a civil diploma course. During his 3rd year, he was selected to work at the BARC. He, therefore, stopped his studies and joined as a trainee there [Table 1]. However, he could not adapt to the changes in the environment, developed appendicitis and got operated on. He was dissatisfied and felt stuck in a cage and wanted to resign. There was a sudden weight gain from 50 kg to 80 kg during this phase, after which he developed leg pains and varicosities.

Table 1: Assessment of Interpersonal Conflict Case 1.
Situation Thought/
feeling
Action Interpretations
Strained IPR
with parents
Felt
Discriminated
compared to
brother and
neglected by parents
Never
shared his
feelings
with
anyone
Defence:
Suppression
Pseudo-
conflicts in
family
Workplace
dissatisfaction
Feels insulted
when a person
with lower
qualifications orders him to
work
Gets
angry but
suppresses
his feeling
Ego conflicts in
the workplace

IPR: Interpersonal relationship

He got married four years prior. His IPR with his wife is good and supportive; they share a good bond with each other. He feels insulted if anyone with the same or lower qualification orders him to do work and gets angry, but does not express it. He is dissatisfied with his current post, wants a promotion to a higher post and keeps on appearing for different Government exams.

He is reserved and talks less. Currently feels anxious about his health. Sleep is disturbed from pain, gets anxious thoughts of disease.

Perceptual differences resulted in pseudo-conflicts with brothers and parents, and insults and dissatisfaction resulted in ego conflicts at the workplace.

The NRI-RQV showed high negative factor scores such as exclusion, pressure and conflict with brothers and parents in the family example of NRI-RQV for case 1 with questionnaire in Annexure 2.

Totality

Mind - Emotions suppressed, Mind - Anxiety health about, Mind - Anxiety anticipation from, Mind - Sensitive to opinion of others, Mind - fear alone of being, Mind - delusions he is neglected, Mind - blood cannot look at, Mind - lack of confidence, Mind - timidity, Sleep - disturbed anxiety from, Generals - Food and drinks - desires salt, Generals - Food and drinks - pungent aversion [Figure 2].

Repertorial chart case 1.
Figure 2:
Repertorial chart case 1.

Case summary

The patient was found to be morbidly sensitive but never expressed his emotions and kept everything within. There are perceptual differences in the family where he feels neglected by his parents. As a result, he appears to be undergoing pseudo-conflict and ego conflict with colleagues at the workplace.

He exhibits a marked dissatisfaction with high sensitivity to other’s opinions. The resulting anger is suppressed, resulting in somatisation. Trying to maintain high dignity despite being insulted or humiliated, high self-control is seen at the workplace, where he feels undignified but suppresses it. Never proud or harsh, unable to fight for their rights, timid.[12] All these suppressed emotions vented out physically with various symptoms led to the prescription of Staphysagria, which resulted in improvement in his physical and mental complaints.

Case 2

A 37-year-old man reported severe pain with a pulling sensation and bulging in the varicose veins of his left leg and thigh for ten years. Complaints started after vexation two and were worse by standing three and walking three and better after lying down 3. He also had frequent belching+2, burning in the retrosternal region on and off for 15 years, and worse at midnight and after fried food. He also reported frequent micturition, 20–25 times/day for eight years. There was no burning or incontinence, but the complaint was worse at night.

Life history

The patient comes from a low-income family; his father was a fisherman. The patient always respected his father and his efforts to fulfil family needs, and at times, he cried alone when his father failed to do so despite hard work. He started working and helping his father at the age of 8–9 years to see his father relaxed and happy.

The patient shifted to P at the suggestion of an aunt and started working in a company. He sent almost his entire salary to his family, only keeping a small amount for himself.

During a home visit, he suggested that his brother study hard for a better future. His father did not like his talk and accused him of trying to become the head of the family. The patient felt very bad and resolved not to say anything then onward. He used to weep and think of his father’s comment and did not visit his home for two years.

Some years prior, on his father’s demand, the patient sent some money to buy property. The patient requested the father to buy the property in his name; the father agreed but did not do this. When the patient asked, the father made excuses. The patient felt extremely sad but never reacted and instead wept alone. His health started getting affected as he developed hepatitis and increasingly distended varicose veins.

Hurt self-esteem developed ego conflict and belief of betrayal by father resulted in value conflicts with the family [Table 2].

Table 2: Assessment of interpersonal conflict case 2.
Situation Thought/feeling Action Interpretation
Father
scolded him
for advising
brothers and trying to be head of family
Disappointment,
felt hurt,
brooding over
father’s behaviour
Suppressed
his
feelings,
did not go home for two years and now does not talk to his father
Defence-
Withdrawal
Ego conflicts

The NRI-RQV shows high negative factor scores such as conflict, criticism, exclusion, dominance and pressure for the father.

Totality

Mind - Ailments from anger suppressed, Mind - sensitive to rudeness, Mind - sensitive to reproach, Mind - delusion neglected he is, Mind - responsibility, taking too seriously, Mind - dwells, past disagreeable events on, Mind - forsaken feeling, Mind - conscientious, trifles on, Perspiration, profuse, Generals-food and drinks- sweets desire, Generals- food and drinks-meat desire, Generals- food and drinks-milk aversion [Figure 3].

Repertorial chart case 2.
Figure 3:
Repertorial chart case 2.

Case summary

Interpersonal conflict is based on values and expectations (value conflict, ego conflict). He feels hurt and forsaken and withdraws himself from his father, with whom he had a strong attachment. He suppresses his emotions and continues his responsibility as a son, suffering a lot mentally and physically, but wants his father to be happy. This indicates emotional dependability with a strong sense of duty. He is dissatisfied and disappointed while serving others and feels forsaken while developing somatic affections in the venous circulatory system, biliary system and glands; all this led to the prescription of Mag Mur. Mag Mur shows this same emotional sensitivity and wants others to be happy while suppressing their feelings and suffering in silence.

Case 3

A 27-year-old woman was brought by relatives for her recurrent complaints of flaccidity of lower extremities and up-rolling of eyes without loss of consciousness for nine years. The episode lasts for 5–10 min, followed by weakness +3. Ailments from shock +3 (news of divorce), fright +3, anticipation +2 and disappointment +2.

Life history

The patient does not share a good IPR with her parents and harbours strong anger toward them all the time, as her father did not allow her to study after 7th standard. The patient’s mother puts a lot of pressure on her to speak well and behave pleasingly, as the patient shouts and behaves rudely. She always felt that all her family members have controlled and dominated her throughout her life.

She was found to have attraction toward one of her cousins at the age of 11–12 years, due to which her mother made a scene. Her father beat her badly and stopped her from going out and speaking to anyone. She was frightened by her father’s anger and used to cry. Her father had her married to a person ten years older than her.

Her mother-in-law used to criticise her for all her work. She felt caged again after marriage. She used to fall ill often, after which her husband agreed to stay separately. However, he demanded money from the patient’s father for a house, failing which he threatened to file for divorce. This came as a big shock to the patient. She wept while listening to this and got her first episode of symptoms, which then became a regular occurrence [Table 3].

Table 3: Assessment of interpersonal conflict case 3.
Situation Thought/feeling Action Interpretation
Restriction
and
Comments about patient
Feels dominated,
caged
Quarrelling,
Anger,
Abusive
Defence:
Acting out Ego conflicts

Her relationship with her husband is strained as she feels there is no love between them. Her sexual desire and excitement vanish when she sees him. She has had a boyfriend for four years; they have had a physical relationship, and she claims they are in love. The patient feels confused as she cannot leave her husband due to children and cannot leave her boyfriend either. In July 2019, her boyfriend got married, after which she had the 2nd episode of convulsion. Despite his marriage, they still talk and occasionally meet.

Ego conflict with a feeling of being dominated, controlled and forced.

NRI-RQV shows high negative factor scores for the husband and MIL.

Totality

Mind - ailments from mental shock, Mind - violent anger, Mind - anger, contradiction to, Mind - sensitive, reprimands to, Mind - sensitive, criticism to, Mind - indifference, loved ones to, Mind - quarrelsome, Mind - hysterical, Mind - Dreams, amorous, Generals- food and drinks- milk aggravation, Generals- food and drinks- pungent things desire [Figure 4].

Repertorial chart case 3.
Figure 4:
Repertorial chart case 3.

Case summary

The patient wants to be independent, and when forced to do things opposed to her intention, she feels caged, dominated and criticised. She defends herself through quarrelling hysterical behaviour. Hence, ego-based interpersonal conflict is prominent. Indifferent to family and friends, she is much more concerned with her petty affairs. Easily produces anger and irritability, hitting children in a bad way with no natural affection of a mother, not being able to feel natural affection for her husband.[12] This characteristic mental state with hysterical behaviour led to the prescription of Sepia, which showed significant improvement in her complaints.

Case 4

A 48-year-old man complained of anxiety +3, palpitations, perspiration +2, difficulty in breathing +2 and fear of death +3. The complaint started after he was frightened by witnessing the death of a neighbouring patient in the COVID ward. The complaint is triggered after hearing the ambulance siren3 or any bad news 2. Complaints get better by eructations +2 and listening to music+2.

Life space

The patient comes from a well-educated family where most of the members are in the teaching profession. Since childhood, the patient has been anxious, especially before exams. He even gets anxious at his work place for the work he knows perfectly well. The patient shares cordial relationships with co-workers and with his wife. During the COVID-19 pandemic, he was infected and needed hospitalisation. He recovered well, but one night, he witnessed the patient in the next bed dying, which frightened him. He saw that person gasping for breath and his family members crying at his death. Since then, he developed episodes of breathlessness, for which he received nasal oxygen. He kept on thinking about that patient and imagining his death.

The patient’s elder son has appeared thrice for the NEET examinations without passing, which is a source of stress for the patient. For the third failure, the son blamed the patient as he also contracted a COVID-19 infection, which affected his performance. The son often argues with the parents and has lodged a police complaint twice. The police investigated the matter; after the second complaint, they scolded the son for making false reports.

The son often fights with the patient about minor issues. The patient blames himself and his upbringing style; he compares his relationship with his father. He is in constant anticipation about his son arguing with him. He even feels he will die with all these thoughts [Table 4].

Table 4: Assessment of interpersonal conflict case 4.
Situation Thought/
feeling
Action Interpretation
Strained IPR with son, poor performance in examinations, poor behaviour Anticipates, feels he will die, feels ashamed Brooding,
anticipation
Defence: suppression Value conflict

IPR: Interpersonal relationship

This case shows value conflict as the patient finds it difficult to inculcate his values of responsibility and conscience in his son.

NRI-RQV

The patient’s life history showed discord with his son in the family, so a column for the son was added to the questionnaire to assess the quality of their relationship.

The NRI-RQV shows high negative factor scores with son.

Totality

Mind- ailments from anticipation, Mind- ailments from fear, Mind- ailments from fright, Mind- fear of death, Mind-anxiety of future, Mind- anxiety about health, Mind- anxiety about conscience, Mind- conscientious, trifles, Dreams - dead relatives of sleep - disturbed thoughts by, Generals -food & drinks, warm drinks desire, Generals - food & drinks, warm food desire [Figure 5].

Repertorial chart case 4.
Figure 5:
Repertorial chart case 4.

Case summary

This patient presents with high ideals, morals and disciplined behaviour. As the son opposes his values and morals, the patient is worried about his social image and his son’s future. This results in a dissatisfied and depressed mental state. He is anxious for his health and has a fear of death with palpitations. Anticipation makes him worse, and he is a conscientious and family-oriented man who dreams of dead relatives with rigid and inflexible values. All these mental symptoms and physical generals led to the prescription of Kalicarb.

DISCUSSION

  • High negative scores in the NRI-RQV indicated discord and conflicts in relationships and helped eliminate subjective biases regarding IPR conflicts.

  • The first 3 cases showed ego conflicts, perhaps due to fragile ego when hurt resulted in feelings of inferiority. Cases 2 and 4 had value conflicts due to disappointment caused by the inability to impose their values on others. Case 1 demonstrated pseudo-conflicts caused by miscommunication.

  • Dissatisfaction, indifference, forsakenness, depression and anxiety were the prominent mental states due to IPR conflicts.

  • IPR conflicts in the Mineral Kingdom: Out of four, two cases were prescribed mineral remedies. The themes of ‘structure’ and ‘organisation’ are seen with conflicts arising while maintaining, lacking forming and breakdown of their structures (cases 2 and 4). Value conflict was seen in two cases – those prescribed Kali carb and Mag mur.[12-14]

  • IPR conflicts in the Plant kingdom: Staphysagria (belonging to the Rananculaceae family) was found to have ego and pseudo-IPR conflicts. This is similar to the expressions shared in Materia Medica about the plant kingdom remedies and their sensitivities. IPR conflict was found as a result of an inability to handle those sensitivities, causing sadness and gloomy states.[12]

  • IPR conflicts in the Animal Kingdom: An Animal Kingdom remedy was prescribed in one case, which was from the Mollusca group. The patient had an ego conflict. This concurs with the expression of the Mollusca group, where want of freedom, intolerance to dominance and hysterical and violent expressions are observed due to ego conflicts.[12,15]

CONCLUSION

  • Understanding the type of conflict can help us to see the group of homoeopathic remedies based on the types of IPR conflicts, and a suitable similimum can be selected after differentiations. Expanding the study will help to expand the homoeopathic Materia Medica literature and its application in the homoeopathic management of patients affected by psychological disturbances.

Acknowledgements

We wish to thank the Director, Dr. M. L. Dhawale Memorial Trust’s Hospital (DTH), Palghar for permission to publish the cases. The paper originated in a Dissertation entitled ‘Exploring the types of interpersonal conflicts and its emerging remedies: A Prospective case series study’ by the first named author, which was in part-fulfilment of the MD (Hom) degree granted by the Maharashtra University of Health Sciences (MUHS), Nashik. The second author was the guide to the study. We are thankful to the MUHS, Nashik, for permission to conduct the study.

Ethical approval

The Institutional Ethics Committee has given the ethical approval for the study. Reference Number: MLDMHI/P/M12-086/2019.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

Use of artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted technology for manuscript preparation

The authors confirm that there was no use of artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted technology for assisting in the writing or editing of the manuscript and no images were manipulated using AI.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

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ANNEXURE

Annexure 1: Questionnaire for NRI-RQV.
Companionship (COM)
  1 How often do you spend fun time with this person?
  11 How often do you and this person go places and do things together?
  21 How often do you play around and have fun with this person?
Intimate Disclosure (DIS) 2 How often do you tell this person, things that you don’t want others to know?
  12 How often do you tell this person everything that you are going through?
  22 How often do you share secrets and private feelings with this person?
Pressure (PRE) 3 How often does this person push you to do things that you don’t want to do?
  13 How often does this person try to get you to do things that you don’t like?
  23 How often does this person pressure you to do the things that he or she wants?
Satisfaction (SAT) 66
  4 How happy are you with your relationship with this person?
  14 How much do you like the way things are between you and this person?
  24 How satisfied are you with your relationship with this person?
Conflict (CON) 5 How often do you and this person disagree and quarrel with each other?
  15 How often do you and this person get mad at or get in fights with each other?
  25 How often do you and this person argue with each other
Emotional Support (SUP) 6 How often do you turn to this person for support with personal problems?
  16 How often do you depend on this person for help, advice, or sympathy?
  26 When you are feeling down or upset, how often do you depend on this person to cheer things up?
Criticism (CRI) 7 How often does this person point out your faults or put you down?
  17 How often does this person criticise you?
  27 How often does this person say mean or harsh things to you?
Approval (APP) 8 How often does this person praise you for the kind of person you are?
  18 How often does this person seem really proud of you?
  28 How much does this person like or approve of the things you do?
Dominance (DOM) 9 How often does this person get their way when you two do not agree about what to do?
  19 How often does this person end up being the one who makes the decisions for both of you?
  29 How often does this person get you to do things their way?
Exclusion (EXC) 10 How often does this person not include you in activities?
  20 How often does it seem like this person ignores you?
  30 How often does it seem like this person does not give you the amount of attention that you want?

NRI-RQV: Network of relationship inventory-relationship quality version

Annexure 2: Case example of application of NRI-RQV in Case 1.
Mother Father Sibling Same sex friend Opposite sex friend Spouse
Companionship 3/15 3/15 3/15 9/15 --- 12/15
Satisfaction 6/15 6/15 6/15 9/15 --- 12/15
Intimate disclosure 3/15 3/15 3/15 9/15 --- 12/15
Emotional support 3/15 3/15 3/15 9/15 --- 12/15
Approval 6/15 6/15 6/15 9/15 --- 12/15
Conflict 9/15 9/15 12/15 3/15 --- 3/15
Criticism 6/15 6/15 6/15 3/15 --- 3/15
Exclusion 9/15 9/15 12/15 3/15 --- 3/15
Pressure 6/15 9/15 9/15 3/15 --- 3/15
Companionship 3/15 3/15 3/15 9/15 --- 12/15

NRI-RQV: Network of relationship inventory-relationship quality version

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