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Editorial
6 (
1
); 1-2
doi:
10.25259/JISH_26_2023

Beginnings, ends and newer beginnings

Department of Repertory, Dr. M. L. Dhawale Memorial Homoeopathic Institute, Palghar, Maharashtra, India
Corresponding author: Dr. Nikunj J. Jani, Department of Repertory, Dr. M. L. Dhawale Memorial Homoeopathic Institute, Palghar, Maharashtra, India. drnikunj@gmail.com
Licence
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Jani NJ. Beginnings, ends and newer beginnings. J Intgr Stand Homoeopathy 2023;6:1-2.

Once again, there is a renewed debate in the mainstream and social media on the efficacy and effectiveness of homoeopathy. No system of medicine has been subjected to as much ridicule and contempt as homoeopathy. We have reached a stage where no amount of scientific work put in by our fraternity stands ground in the media trial. It is always subjected to criticism. One of the most common accusations levelled against the homoeopathic fraternity is the lack of evidence-based findings and experimental studies.

Unfortunately, these debates are slowly denting the public support that homoeopathy has enjoyed for over two centuries. The question we all need to ask ourselves is, are we taking this support for granted? Are we adapting to the changing world? Are we doing enough research? Is the research done by our organizations and teaching institutes reaching the practitioners and patients? Are we including the newer findings from our research studies in our teaching curriculum? Or are we just content teaching the old things? Medicine is evolving at a rapid pace; is homoeopathy still living in a time warp? Are we just happy with past laurels? These are the questions that we as a profession need to ask ourselves. We need to debate so that future generations of practitioners can sustain, survive and thrive in this rapidly changing and evolving world.

Studies have shown that homoeopathic remedies can facilitate epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation. This is a very relevant discovery because DNA methylation plays an important role in the expression of many genes. Understanding of the genes targeted by different homoeopathic remedies, along with information about the function of the proteins encoded by the targeted genes provides a further approach to homoeopathic remedy selection. [1]

Homoeopathic medicines, in low and high dilutions and in their nano-encapsulated forms, have been reported to have anticancer/anti-hepatotoxic effects in mice and rats in vivo and in various cancer cells in vitro.[2-4] Studies have demonstrated the efficacy of homoeopathic dilutions in treating the U-2 OS lineage of osteosarcoma cancer cells.[5] Another study highlights the efficacy of Ruta D35 for inhibiting in vitro cytotoxic activity in SKBR3 and PMC42 breast cancer cells, thereby reducing cell viability.[6] In vitro studies help us to demonstrate the efficacy of homoeopathic medicines and these need to be presented to the medical community at large. To begin with, the newer curriculum across the various universities must include these studies so that the newer generation of students is aware of these as well. This is a change which we as a profession must strive to bring in.

In this issue, we have an original article that aims to evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial activities of nine homoeopathic preparations through an in vitro study.[7] This will surely pave way for more such studies in future.

We also have an interesting review article highlighting the scope of homoeopathy in hyperkeratotic lesions of the foot[8] and two evidence-based case reports highlighting the role and efficacy of homoeopathy in cases of Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder[9] and Epilepsy.[10]

Change is the only constant. It defines life on earth and shapes its course. But typically, we humans are averse to change. We resist it as it often requires us to give up the old and start afresh which needs resources - physical, emotional, intellectual and even spiritual to accept change and move on. One must learn to change from nature: seasons change, the flora, fauna, and animals adapt to changes and move on.

In February this year, our world underwent a shocking change. We lost a stalwart homoeopath, Dr. Nityanand L. Tiwari. The loss is not just limited to the Dr. M. L. Dhawale Memorial Organizations with which he had a lifelong association. This is an irreparable loss for the entire homoeopathic fraternity, the urban/rural/tribal communities with whom he worked to deliver quality healthcare, his students (whose lives he touched and changed) and above all, his numerous patients whose lives he healed. Dr. Tiwari believed in change; he believed in moving ahead despite adverse circumstances. He lived life to its fullest. In this issue, we have a moving obituary written by none other than Dr. Kumar Dhawale, his close associate of the last four decades.[11] As I write about Dr. N. L. Tiwari Sir in the past tense, for a moment I pause in disbelief - is it the past?

Here I recall the poem, ‘Immortality’ by Clare Harner.

Do not stand

By my grave, and weep.

I am not there,

I do not sleep—

I am the thousand winds that blow

I am the diamond glints in snow

I am the sunlight on ripened grain,

I am the gentle, autumn rain.

As you awake with morning’s hush,

I am the swift, up-flinging rush

Of quiet birds in circling flight,

I am the day transcending night.

Do not stand

By my grave, and cry—

I am not there,

I did not die.’[12]

He lives on through his teachings, through his publications, through his book- ‘The Journey To Unprejudiced Observation,’[13] through his care and compassion showered on every person associated with him, through his ‘Life and Living’ which he trained everyone in, he lives on in the institutes he was instrumental in building, creating and nurturing. He will continue to live on as TS Eliot rightly said:

And to make an end is to make a beginning. The end is where we start from.’

References

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  2. . An overview of research at University of Kalyani in exploring some basic issues of Homoeopathy. Indian J Res Homoeopathy. 2017;11:147-57.
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  3. , , , . Condurango glycoside-rich components stimulate DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest and ROS-mediated caspase-3 dependent apoptosis through inhibition of cell-proliferation in lung cancer, in vitro and in vivo. Environ Toxicol Pharmacol. 2014;37:300-14.
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  4. , , , . Evaluation of chemopreventive potentials of ethanolic extract of Ruta graveolens against A375 skin melanoma cells in vitro and induced skin cancer in mice in vivo. J Integr Med. 2015;13:34-4.
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  5. , , , , . Homoeopathic Viscum album extract inhibits the growth of osteosarcoma cells. J Intgr Stand Homoeopathy. 2020;3:59-63.
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  6. , , , , . In vitro antitumor activity in breast cancer cells (SKBR3 and PMC42) of Ruta graveolens in homeopathic dilution. J Intgr Stand Homoeopathy. 2022;5:63-6.
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  7. , , , , , , et al. In vitro antimicrobial activity of nine homoeopathic preparations in different volumes against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. J Intgr Stand Homoeopathy. 2023;6:3-8.
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  8. , , . Corns of feet: Can homoeopathy be a better alternative? A narrative review. J Intgr Stand Homoeopathy. 2023;6:9-12.
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  9. , . Role of individualised homoeopathic medicine in the management of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder-a case report. J Intgr Stand Homoeopathy. 2023;6:13-9.
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  10. . Case report-using homoeopathy to enable the holistic healing of a young athlete with epilepsy. J Intgr Stand Homoeopathy. 2023;6:20-4.
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  11. . Nityanand Laxminivas Tiwari (1949-2023) J Intgr Stand Homoeopathy. 2023;6:25-7.
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  12. . Do not Stand at My Grave and Weep by Clare Harner. Available from: https://www.lanredahunsi.com/do-not-stand-at-my-grave-and-weep-by-clare-harner [Last accessed on 2023 Mar 19]
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  13. . The Journey to Unprejudiced Observation Mumbai: Dr. M. L. Dhawale Memorial Trust; .
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